Overlooked: The New York Times Features Female Heroes Who Never Got Obituaries
New York Times journalist Amisha Padnani lamented that, while the newspaper's obituary section routinely payed tribute to men, particularly white men, who contributed to society over the years, powerful stories about women and minorities have been grossly overlooked. Now the New York Times and Padnani are putting the spotlight... »
Stephen Hawking: Quotes He Left Behind
Stephen Hawking died yesterday at the age of 76, leaving behind a large body of theoretical physics work that will be regarded for years to come. During his lifetime he also shared many quotes on living and dying:  “I have lived with the prospect of an early death for the... »
Cryonic Estate Planning: Will You Be Financially Prepared When They Wake You Up?
Cryonics-- having your body cryogenically frozen – seeks to keep either your head (neurocryopreservation) or full body suspended until medical technology advances to the extent that there is a method to revive you in the future. Cryonics vendors already exist and have a price tag on the process itself as... »
Nonagenarians Report Higher Levels of Contentment Than Young People
A few years ago, New York Times journalist John Leland started following the lives of six New Yorkers over 85 years old. Our blog followers may remember our 2015 article A Snapshot of NYC's Oldest Old, One of NYC's Largest, and Most Ignored, Demographics. It talked about the common challenges this older community... »
Dying at Home--a Dream or a Nightmare?
At-home deaths are an increasing trend, up almost 30% since 2000. One quarter of Americans now die at home, which at first blush sounds positive. It's surrounded by ideas of comfort, family, and familiar surroundings. Unfortunately, this spike in at-home deaths is not driven by idyllic reasons. It comes down to money.... »
Once Coveted Japanese Apartment Buildings Now Homes to Lonely Deaths
In the 1960s, families were lining up to live in danchi--huge government-built public housing that introduced the concept of communities focused on the nuclear family rather than traditional multi-generational homes. 50 years ago, tenants had to prove income of 5.5x their rent, and still may have been rejected due to overwhelming demand.... »
Brooklyn Exhibit Leaves Artist's Personal Possessions to Strangers
The Swedish Death Cleaning method of decluttering suggests starting by giving your possessions away to loved ones. Brooklyn artist Lisa Levy is taking the idea a step further in her exhibit "You Can Get My Stuff When I’m Dead." Levy, 61, will display her personal possessions and welcome the public to ask... »
Swedish Death Cleaning: A New Take on Decluttering
Swedish Death Cleaning. Sounds a little sinister, doesn't it? As it turns out, it's a long-term, practical approach to decluttering. In my article "The Quandary of Inherited Heirlooms," I discussed how the burden of disposing of parental possessions has the younger generation in a state of angst, and the older generation in a... »
Does Death Get Less Scary As It Gets Closer?
The fear of death is both rational and reasonable--and sometimes even extreme. Death anxiety is an actual psychological condition. But a study at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill--interestingly spurred by the last words of death row inmates--discovered that the closer one gets to death, the more positive... »
Ask Alison FAQ: What Happens to My Digital Data When I Die?
Ask Alisonby Alison Arden Besunder, Esq.  Q: I have all these digital online accounts, between my Apple ID and music, e-books, my Facebook account, and Picasa. What happens to all of that data when I am disabled or die? Digitally Yours, Tribeca  A: Digitally Yours:  This is a great question, one that... »
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